Passover Seder

An Interfaith Educational Model Passover Seder

Preparing for the Seder

People should be seated around tables with tablecloths, each with a plate and a wine cup. Each person will drink four cups of kosher wine or grape juice during the Seder. People should have easy access to parsley, salt water, Charoset, horseradish, matzah and grape juice.

There also should be pitchers of water, basins and towels, for the washing of hands.

The central table should be set with the following special items.

The Seder plate, which contains, in clockwise order:
Shank bone – zeroa– lamb or roasted chicken leg bone (a roasted beet
is a vegetarian alternative)
Charoset– a mixture of nuts, fruit, wine, and spices
Bitter herbs – maror – typically red or white horseradish (some people
prefer raw horseradish)
Vegetable – karpas– parsley or any other vegetable, such as potatoes
Egg – beitzah– a roasted hard-boiled egg•

A covered plate that holds three pieces of matzah

A bowl of salt water.

An extra wine glass for Elijah the Prophet.

The Seder meal should be prepared and conducted without bread or
other leavened food such as cake. Products made with matzah flour can
be substituted.

The word “Seder” means ‘Order”. There are 15 parts to the Seder, each of which is represented in the order of ceremony that follows.

Seder: The Passover Service

1. Sanctifying the Day- Kadesh

Exodus Chapter 13:

3 And Moses said unto the people: ‘Remember this day, in which ye came out from Egypt, out of the house of bondage; for by strength of hand the LORD brought you out from this place; there shall no leavened bread be eaten. 4 This day ye go forth in the month Abib. 5 And it shall be when the LORD shall bring thee into the land of the Canaanite, and the Hittite, and the Amorite, and the Hivite, and the Jebusite, which He swore unto thy fathers to give thee, a land flowing with milk and honey, that thou shalt keep this service in this month. 6 Seven days thou shalt eat unleavened bread, and in the seventh day shall be a feast to the LORD. 7 Unleavened bread shall be eaten throughout the seven days; and there shall no leavened bread be seen with thee, neither shall there be leaven seen with thee, in all thy borders. 8 And thou shalt tell thy child in that day, saying: It is because of that which the LORD did for me when I came forth out of Egypt. 9 And it shall be for a sign unto thee upon thy hand, and for a memorial between thine eyes, that the law of the LORD may be in thy mouth; for with a strong hand hath the LORD brought thee out of Egypt. 10 Thou shalt therefore keep this ordinance in its season from year to year.

Holding the cup of wine in one’s right hand, recite:
We thank you God for giving us the gift of Festivals for joy and holidays
for happiness, among them this day of Passover, the festival of our lib-
eration, a day of sacred assembly recalling the Exodus from Egypt. Blessed are You who sanctifies the People Israel and the festival seasons.

Blessed are You, Lord our God, King of the Universe,
who creates the fruit of the vine.
Baruch Atah Ado-nai Elo-heinu Melech Ha-olam
Boreh Pree Ha-ga-fen.

Blessed are You, Lord our God, King of the universe, who has kept us
in life, sustained us, and enabled us to reach this season.
Baruch Atah Ado-nai, Elo-heinu Melech Ha-olam, She-heche-yanu,
V’kiye-manu Vehigi-yanu La-z’man Ha-zeh.
The first cup of wine is drunk, and the cup is refilled

2. Urchatz – First Ritual Hand-Washing

Pour water from a cup once on each hand over a sink or basin without reciting a blessing.

3. Karpas – Dipping Parsley in Salt Water

The parsley symbolizes both the humble origins of the
Jewish people as well as the rebirth of spring, which is starting now. (In
Eastern Europe, where green vegetables were not common, a potato was
used instead). The salt water symbolizes the tears shed during our slavery.

Parsley (or any other vegetable such as celery or potato) is dipped in salt water and then eaten. Before eating the vegetable, recite the following blessing:

Blessed are You, Lord our God, King of the Universe, who creates the
fruit of the earth.
Baruch Atah Adonai Elo-heinu Melech Haolam Boreh Pree Ha’adamah.

4. Yachatz – Breaking the Middle Matzah

The middle matzah on the plate is broken in half. One half is put back with the stack; the other half is placed in a napkin (or special holder) and designated the Afikomen (the dessert) and put aside. It is traditional in some homes to hide the afikomen now for children to find before it is eaten after the meal, or for children to “steal” the Afikomen and “hold it ransom.”

5. Maggid – The Telling of the Story of Passover

Raise the tray with the matzot and say:

This is the bread of affliction that our fathers ate in the land of Egypt. Whoever is hungry, let him come and eat; whoever is in need, let him come and conduct the Seder of Passover. This year [we are] here; next year in the land of Israel. This year [we are] slaves; next year [we will be] free people.
The tray with the matzot is moved aside, and the second cup is poured.(Do not drink it yet).

The Four Questions
The youngest child (or any individual) asks (or sings):
Why is this night different from all other nights?
Ma nishtanah ha-lailah ha-zeh mi-kol ha-leilot?

1. On all other nights we eat either bread or
matzah; on this night, why only matzah?

2. On all other nights we eat herbs or vegetables of any kind; on this
night why bitter herbs?

3. On all other nights we do not dip even once; on this night why do
we dip twice?

4. On all other nights we eat our meals in any manner; on this night
why do we sit around the table together in a reclining position?

The rest of the participants at the Seder answer:

We were slaves to Pharaoh in Egypt, and God brought us out with
a strong hand and an outstretched arm. And if God had not brought
our ancestors out of Egypt, we and our children and our children’s
children would still be subjugated to Pharaoh in Egypt. Even if we
were all old and wise and learned in Torah, we would still be
commanded to tell the story of the Exodus from Egypt. And the more
we talk about the Exodus from Egypt, the more praiseworthy
we are.

It happened that Rabbi Eliezer, Rabbi Yehoshua, Rabbi Elazar ben Azaryah, Rabbi Akiva and Rabbi Tarphon were reclining [at a seder] in B’nei Berak. They were discussing the exodus from Egypt all that night, until their students came and told them: “Our Masters! The time has come for reciting the morning Shema!”

The Four Children

The Torah describes four children who ask questions about the Exodus. Tradition teaches that these verses refer to four different types of children.

The wise child asks, “What are the laws that God has commanded us?”
The parent should answer by instructing the child in the laws of Passover, starting from the beginning and ending with the laws of the
Afikomen

The wicked child asks, “What does this Passover service mean to you?”
The parent should answer, “It is because of what God did for me when I
came out of Egypt. Specifically ‘me’ and not ‘you.’ If you had been there (with your attitude), you wouldn’t have been redeemed.”

The simple child asks, “What is this Seder service?”
The parent should answer, “With a mighty hand God brought us out of Egypt.
Therefore, we commemorate that event tonight through this Seder.”

And then there is child who does not know how to ask.
The parent should begin a discussion with that child based on the verse:
“And you shall tell your child on that day, ‘We commemorate Passover tonight because of what God did for us when we went out of Egypt.’”

Deuteronomy Chapter 26:

A wandering Aramean was my father, and he went down into Egypt, and sojourned there, few in number; and he became there a nation, great, mighty, and populous. 6 And the Egyptians dealt ill with us, and afflicted us, and laid upon us hard bondage. 7 And we cried unto the LORD, the God of our fathers, and the LORD heard our voice, and saw our affliction, and our toil, and our oppression. 8 And the LORD brought us forth out of Egypt with a mighty hand, and with an outstretched arm, and with great terribleness, and with signs, and with wonders.

There arose in Egypt a Pharaoh who knew not of the good deeds that
Joseph had done for that country. Thus he enslaved the Jews and
made their lives harsh through servitude and humiliation. This is the
basis for the Passover holiday which we commemorate with these
different rituals tonight.

While the Jews endured harsh slavery in Egypt, God called upon Moses to lead them out to freedom. Moses encountered God at the burning bush and then returned to Egypt to lead the people out of Egypt. He demanded that Pharaoh let the Jewish people go.

But Pharaoh hardened his heart and refused to let the Jewish people go.

The wine cup is now raised and the Matzot are covered.
This is what has stood by our ancestors and by us! For not just one alone has risen against us to destroy us, but in every generation they rise against us to destroy us; and the Holy Blessed One saves us from their hand!
Put down the wine cup and uncover the Matzah.

So God sent the Ten Plagues.

Following the slaying of the first born, Pharaoh allowed the Jewish people to leave. The Jews left Egypt in such haste that their dough did not rise, so they ate matzah.

When Pharaoh changed his mind and chased after the Israelites,
God miraculously caused the Red Sea to split, allowing the Israelites to cross safely. When the Egyptians entered the Sea, it returned to its natural state and the mighty Egyptian army drowned

It is a tradition to remove ten drops of wine from our cups as we recite the ten plagues as a remembrance that while the Jews were redeemed through these plagues, people did suffer.

Remove a drop of wine for each plague as you recite its name.

1.Blood Dam

2.Frogs Tze-phar-day-ah

3.Vermin Kee-nim

4.Beasts Arov

5.Cattle Disease De-ver

6.Boils She-heen

7.Hail Ba-rad

8.Locusts Ar-beh

9.Darkness Cho-shech

10.Slaying of the first born Ma-kat Bechorot

In telling the story of Passover, we sing a song listing all the wonderful acts God performed for the Israelites when they left Egypt.

Dayenu-

Ilu ho-tsi, ho-tsi-a-nu,
Ho-tsi-anu mi-Mitz-ra-yim
Ho-tsi-anu mi-Mitz-ra-yim
Da-ye-nu

Chorus:
Da-da-ye-nu,
Da-da-ye-nu,
Da-da-ye-nu,
Da-da-ye-nu,
Da-ye-nu Da-ye-nu

The company repeats the refrain “Dayenu” which is equivalent to “It would have satisfied us”.
How manifold are the favors which God has conferred upon us!

 

HAD GOD divided the sea, and not permitted us to cross on dry land, Dayenu!

HAD GOD permitted us to cross the sea on dry land, and not sustained us for forty years in the desert, Dayenu!

HAD GOD sustained us for forty years in the desert, and not fed us with manna, Dayenu!

HAD GOD fed us with manna, and not ordained the Sabbath, Dayenu!

HAD GOD ordained the Sabbath, and not brought us to Mount Sinai, Dayenu!

HAD GOD brought us to Mount Sinai, and not given us the Torah, Dayenu

HAD GOD given us the Torah, and not led us into the Land of Israel, Dayenu!

HAD GOD led us into the Land of Israel, and not built for us the Temple, Dayenu!

HAD GOD built for us the Temple, and not sent us prophets of truth, Dayenu!

HAD GOD sent us prophets of truth, and not made us a holy people, Dayenu!

All read in unison:
How much more then are we to be grateful unto the Lord for the manifold favors which God has bestowed upon us! God brought us out of Egypt, divided the Red Sea for us, permitted us to cross on dry land, sustained us for forty years in the desert, fed us with manna, ordained the Sabbath, brought us to Mount Sinai, gave us the Torah, led us into the Land of Israel, built for us the Temple, sent unto us prophets of truth, and made us a holy people to perfect the world under the kingdom of the Almighty, in truth and in righteousness.

The Passover Symbols

Should enemies again assail us, the remembrance of the exodus of our ancestors from Egypt will never fail to inspire us with new courage, and the symbols of this festival will help to strengthen our faith in God, who redeems the oppressed.
Therefore, Rabban Gamaliel, a noted sage, declared: “Whoever does not well consider the meaning of these three symbols: Pesaḥ, Matzo and Moror, has not truly celebrated this Festival”.

PESAḤ

One of the company asks:
WHAT is the meaning of Pesaḥ?
The leader lifts up the roasted shank-bone (or roasted beet) and answers:
Pesaḥ means the PASCHAL LAMB, and is symbolized by this shank-bone. It was eaten by our fathers while the Temple was in existence, as a memorial of God’s favors, as it is said: “It is the sacrifice of the Lord’s PASSOVER, for that God PASSED OVER the houses of the children of Israel in Egypt, when God smote the Egyptians and delivered our houses”. As God in the ancient “Watch-Night” passed over and spared the houses of Israel, so did He save us in all kinds of distress, and so may God always shield the afflicted, and for ever remove every trace of bondage from among the humanity.

MATZO

One of the company asks:
What is the meaning of Matzo?
The leader lifts up the Matzo and answers:
Matzo, called THE BREAD OF AFFLICTION, was the hasty provision that our ancestors made for their journey, as it is said: “And they baked unleavened cakes of the dough which they brought out of Egypt. There was not sufficient time to leaven it, for they were driven out of Egypt and could not tarry, neither had they prepared for themselves any provisions.” The bread which of necessity they baked unleavened, thus became a symbol of divine help.

MOROR

One of the company asks:
And what is the meaning of MOROR?
The leader lifts up the bitter herbs and answers:
Moror means BITTER HERB. We eat it in order to recall that the lives of our ancestors were embittered by the Egyptians, as we read: ‘And they made their lives bitter with hard labor in mortar and bricks and in all manner of field labor. Whatever task was imposed upon them, was executed with the utmost rigor.” As we eat it in the midst of the festivities of this night, we rejoice in the heroic spirit which trials developed in our people. Instead of becoming embittered by them, they were sustained and strengthened.

IN EVERY generation, each of us should regard ourselves as though we too were brought out of Egypt. Not our ancestors alone, but us also, did the Holy One redeem; for not alone in Egypt but in many other lands, have we groaned under the burden of affliction and suffered as victims of malice, ignorance and fanaticism. This very night which we, a happy generation, celebrate so calmly and safely and joyfully in our habitations was often turned into a night of anxiety and of suffering for our people in former times. Cruel mobs were ready to rush upon them and to destroy their homes and the fruit of their labors. But undauntedly they clung to their faith in the ultimate triumph of right and of freedom. Champions of God, they marched from one Egypt into another—driven in haste, their property a prey to the rapacious foe, with their bundles on their shoulders, and God in their hearts.
Because God, “the Guardian of Israel, who sleepeth not nor slumbereth” revealed the Divine Self on that WATCH-NIGHT IN EGYPT and in all dark periods of our past, as the Redeemer of the enslaved, we keep this as a WATCH-NIGHT FOR ALL THE CHILDREN OF ISRAEL, dedicated to God our redeemer.
Lift our cups

Therefore, it is our duty to thank the One who performed all the miracles for generations past and present, Who took us from slavery to freedom, from sorrow to joy, and from mourning to festivity, and from deep darkness to great light and from bondage to redemption. Let us therefore recite before God a new song, Halleluyah!

Ve-nomar Lefanav Shira Hadasha, Halleluyah!

Lower our cups

We start saying Psalms praising God for taking us of Egypt.

Psalm 114

When Israel came forth out of Egypt, the house of Jacob from a people of strange language;
Judah became God’s sanctuary, Israel God’s dominion.
The sea saw it, and fled; the Jordan River turned backward.
The mountains skipped like rams, the hills like young sheep.
What ails you, O that sea, that you flea? The Jordan River, that you turn
backward?
You mountains, that you skip like rams; you hills, like young sheep?
Tremble, earth, at the presence of the Lord, at the presence of the God of
Jacob;
Who turned the rock into a pool of water, the flint into a fountain of waters.

A blessing is then said over the second cup of wine :

Blessed are You, Lord our God, King of the Universe, who creates the
fruit of the vine.
Baruch Atah Ado-nai Elo-heinu Melech Ha-olam Boreh Pree Ha-ga-fen.

We drink the second cup of wine.

6. Second Ritual Handwashing – Rachtzah

Pour water from a cup once on each hand over a sink or basin hands, this time with a blessing, to prepare for the eating of the matzah.
Recite this blessing after washing hands:

Blessed are You, Lord our God, King of the Universe, who has sancti-
fied us with His laws and commanded us to wash our hands.
Baruch Atah Ado-nai Elo-heinu Melech Ha-olam Asher Kid’shanu
B’mitzvotav V’tzivanu Al Nitilat Yadayim.

7 & 8. Blessings before Eating Matzah

Motzi-Matzah: Bread of Affliction Which We Ate on our Way to Freedom

The Motzi blessing is recited over bread at the beginning of a meal. Tonight we use matzah.

Blessed are You, Lord our God, King of the Universe, who brings
bread from the earth.
Baruch Atah Ado-nai Elo-heinu Melech Ha-olam Hamotzi Lechem
Min Ha-aretz.

A specific blessing for matzah only said on Seder night is now said:

Blessed are You, Lord our God, King of the Universe, who has sanctified us with His laws and commanded us to eat matzah.
Baruch Atah Ado-nai, Elo-heinu Melech Ha-olam, Asher Kid’shanu
B’mitzvotav V’tzivanu Al Achilat matzah.

Matzah is passed among the Seder participants and eaten.

.
9. Maror – Eating the Bitter Herbs: Reminding us of the bitterness of slavery.

Blessed are You, Lord our God, King of the Universe, who has sancti-
fied us with His laws and commanded us to eat bitter herbs.
Baruch Atah Ado-nai, Elo-heinu Melech Ha-olam, Asher Kid’shanu
B’mitzvotav V’tzivanu Al Achilat Maror.

The Maror (bitter herbs) is eaten.

10. Korech – Matzah and Charoset Sandwich

Each person makes a sandwich using two pieces of matzah with
Maror and Haroset (a mixture of nuts, fruit, wine, and spices that symbolizes the mortar used by the Jewish people to make bricks while enslaved in Egypt).

This is done in commemoration of an enactment made by the great sage Hillel, who lived in the time of the Second Temple, to eat the Passover sacrifice together with matzah and maror in a sandwich

11. Shulchan Orech –
We eat matzah, fruit and non-bready refreshments, over questions and answers – while the children hunt for the Afikomen.

12. The Afikomen (Dessert Matzah) – Tzafun
The piece of matzah put aside earlier as the Afikomen is eaten as a dessert. [It is traditional in some homes to hide the Afikomen for children to find before this point, or for children to “steal” the Afikomen
and “hold it ransom.” Children who participate should be rewarded and praised at this point.]

13. Grace after the Meal- Barech
The cup of wine is refilled, and Birkat Ha-mazon, Grace after the Meal, is recited:

Blessed are You, Lord our God, Ruler of the Universe, who sustains the
entire world with goodness, grace, loving kindness, and compassion,
Who gives bread to all, for God’s grace is everlasting. In God’s great
goodness we have never lacked anything and we will never be
deprived of food for the sake of God’s great name. For God
provides for all and does good for all and prepares food for all
creatures that God has created. Blessed are You, Lord, who provides for all.
God and God of our ancestors, may You remember us on this day of
Passover to bless us with kindness and mercy for a life of peace and
happiness.

We pray that the One who establishes peace in the heavens grant peace
for us, for all Israel, and all of humankind, and let us say, Amen.

A blessing over the third cup of wine is recited:

Blessed are You, Lord our God, Ruler of the Universe, who creates the
fruit of the vine.
Baruch Atah Ado-nai Elo-heinu Melech Ha-olam Boreh Pree Ha-ga-fen.

We drink the third cup of wine.

14. Hallel – Praise

Welcoming Elijah

The fourth and final cup of wine is now filled.
An additional cup is then filled and set aside for the prophet Elijah (Eliyahu).

Tradition says that Elijah, who will precede the arrival of the Messiah, makes an appearance at every Seder. We read these words from the Torah which, if lived out, will help bring the Messianic age:

From Deuteronomy Chapter 24:
17 Thou shalt not pervert the justice due to the stranger, or to the fatherless; nor take the widow’s raiment to pledge. 18 But thou shalt remember that thou wast a bondman in Egypt, and the LORD thy God redeemed thee thence; therefore I command thee to do this thing.
19 When thou reapest thy harvest in thy field, and hast forgot a sheaf in the field, thou shalt not go back to fetch it; it shall be for the stranger, for the fatherless, and for the widow; that the LORD thy God may bless thee in all the work of thy hands.
20 When thou beatest thine olive-tree, thou shalt not go over the boughs again; it shall be for the stranger, for the fatherless, and for the widow. 21 When thou gatherest the grapes of thy vineyard, thou shalt not glean it after thee; it shall he for the stranger, for the fatherless, and for the widow. 22 And thou shalt remember that thou wast a bondman in the land of Egypt; therefore I command thee to do this thing.
We open a door to allow Elijah to enter and sing the song Eliyahu Hanavi:
Elijah the Prophet, Elijah the Tishbite, Elijah the Giladite, may he come speedily to us in our days along with Messiah the son of David.
Eliyahu Hanavi, Eliyahu Hatishbi, Eliyahu Hagiladi, Bimheirah Yavo Eileinu Im Mashiach Ben David.

The soul of every living being shall bless Your Name, L-rd, our G-d; and the spirit of all flesh shall always glorify and exalt Your remembrance, our King. From the beginning to the end of the world You are Almighty G-d; and other than You we have no King, Redeemer and Savior who delivers, rescues, sustains, answers and is merciful in every time of trouble and distress; we have no King but You.

G-d of all creatures, Lord of all events, who is extolled with manifold praises, who directs His world with kindness and His creatures with compassion. Behold, the L-rd neither slumbers nor sleeps. He arouses the sleepers and awakens the slumberous, gives speech to the mute, releases the bound, supports the falling and raises up those who are bowed.

Even if our mouths were filled with song as the sea, and our tongues with joyous singing like the multitudes of its waves, and our lips with praise like the expanse of the sky; and our eyes shining like the sun and the moon, and our hands spread out like the eagles of heaven, and our feet swift like deer we would still be unable to thank You L-rd, our G d and G d of our fathers, and to bless Your Name, for even one of the thousands of millions, and myriads of myriads, of favors, miracles and wonders which You have done for us and for our fathers before us. L-rd, our G d.

You have redeemed us from Egypt, You have freed us from the house of bondage, You have fed us in famine and nourished us in plenty; You have saved us from the sword and delivered us from pestilence, and raised us from evil and lasting maladies. Until now Your mercies have helped us, and Your kindnesses have not forsaken us; and do not abandon us, L-rd our G d, forever!
Therefore, the limbs which You have arranged within us, and the spirit and soul which You have breathed into our nostrils, and the tongue which You have placed in our mouth they all shall thank, bless, praise, glorify, exalt, adore, sanctify and proclaim the sovereignty of Your Name, our King.

Every mouth shall offer thanks to You, every tongue shall swear by You, every eye shall look to You, every knee shall bend to You, all who stand erect shall bow down before You, all hearts shall fear You, and every innermost part shall sing praise to Your Name, as it is written: “All my bones will say, L-rd, who is like You;

You save the poor from one stronger than he, the poor and the needy from one who would rob him!” Who can be likened to You, who is equal to You, who can be compared to You, the great, mighty, awesome G d, G d most high, Possessor of heaven and earth! We will laud You, praise You and glorify You, and we will bless Your holy Name e, as it is said: “[A Psalm] by David; bless the L-rd, O my soul, and all that is within me [bless] His holy Name.”

Blessed are You, L-rd, Almighty G d, King, great and extolled in praises, G d of thanksgivings, L-rd of wonders, Creator of all souls, Master of all creatures, who takes pleasure in songs of praise; the only King, the Life of all worlds.

The blessing over the fourth cup of wine is recited:

Blessed are You, Lord our God, King of the Universe, who creates the
fruit of the vine.
Baruch Atah Ado-nai Elo-heinu Melech Ha-olam Boreh Pree Ha-ga-fen.

The fourth cup of wine is drunk.

15. Closing Section – Nirtzah

We conclude the official part of the Seder with a final prayer asking God to bring the Messianic Era, when all of us will be gathered to Jerusalem as all humankind dwells in peace.
We have finished the Passover Seder according to its precepts and customs.
All read in unison:

THE FESTIVE service is completed. With songs of praise, we have lifted up the cups symbolizing the divine promises of salvation, and have called upon the name of God. We lift our souls to God in faith and in hope. May the One who broke Pharaoh’s yoke for ever shatter all fetters of oppression, and hasten the day when swords shall, at last, be broken and wars ended. Soon may God cause the glad tidings of redemption to be heard in all lands, so that all humankind—freed from violence and from wrong, and united in an eternal covenant of sisterhood and brotherhood—may celebrate the universal Passover in the name of our God of freedom.
Next year, may we all dwell in peace!

Next Year in Jerusalem!!
Lishana Ha-baah Bi-yerushalyim

Songs

It is traditional to conclude the Seder with fun songs geared towards the
young members.

A Madrigal of Numbers

The leader asks the questions. The whole company responds, each reading as fast as possible, in the effort to finish the answer first.
Who knows One?
I know One: One is the God of the World.
Who knows Two?
I know Two: Two Tables of the Covenant. One God of the World.
Who knows Three?
I know Three: Three Patriarchs; Two Tables of the Covenant; One God of the World.
Who knows Four?
I know Four: Four Mothers of Israel; Three Patriarchs; Two Tables of the Covenant; One God of the World.

Who knows Five?
I know Five: Five Books of Moses; Four Mothers of Israel; Three Patriarchs; Two Tables of the Covenant; One God of the World.
Who knows Six?
I know Six: Six Days of Creation; Five Books of Moses; Four Mothers of Israel; Three Patriarchs; Two Tables of the Covenant; One God of the World.
Who knows Seven?
I know Seven: Seven Days of the Week; Six Days of Creation; Five Books of Moses; Four Mothers of Israel; Three Patriarchs; Two Tables of the Covenant; One God of the World.
Who knows Eight?
I know Eight: Eight Lights of Ḥanukkah; Seven Days of the Week; Six Days of Creation; Five Books of Moses; Four Mothers of Israel; Three Patriarchs; Two Tables of the Covenant; One God of the World.
Who knows Nine?
I know Nine: Nine Festivals *; Eight Lights of Ḥanukkah; Seven Days of the Week; Six Days of Creation; Five Books of Moses; Four Mothers of Israel; Three Patriarchs; Two Tables of the Covenant; One God of the World.

Who knows Ten?
I know Ten: Ten Commandments; Nine Festivals; Eight Lights of Ḥanukkah; Seven Days of the Week; Six Days of Creation; Five Books of Moses; Four Mothers of Israel; Three Patriarchs; Two Tables of the Covenant; One God of the World.
Who knows Eleven?
I know Eleven: Eleven Stars in Joseph’s Dream; Ten Commandments; Nine Festivals; Eight Lights of Ḥanukkah; Seven Days of the Week; Six Days of Creation; Five Books of Moses; Four Mothers of Israel; Three Patriarchs; Two Tables of the Covenant; One God of the World.
Who knows Twelve?
I know Twelve: Twelve Tribes; Eleven Stars; Ten Commandments; Nine Festivals; Eight Lights of Ḥanukkah; Seven Days of the Week; Six Days of Creation; Five Books of Moses; Four Mothers of Israel; Three Patriarchs; Two Tables of the Covenant; One God of the World.
Who knows Thirteen?
I know Thirteen: Thirteen Attributes of God *; Twelve Tribes; Eleven Stars; Ten Commandments; Nine Festivals; Eight Lights of Ḥanukkah; Seven Days of the Week; Six Days of Creation; Five Books of Moses; Four Mothers of Israel; Three Patriarchs; Two Tables of the Covenant; One God of the World.
________________________________________
Footnotes

The nine Jewish festivals are: 1. Pesaḥ (Passover), 2. Shabuoth (Feast of Weeks, or Pentecost) 3. Rosh Hashanah (New Year) 4. Yom Kippur (Day of Atonement) 5. Succoth (Feast of Tabernacles) 6. Sh’mini Atzereth (Eighth Day of Solemn Assembly) 7. Simḥath Torah (Rejoicing in the Law), 8. Ḥanukkah (Feast of Dedication or Feast of Lights) 9. Purim (Feast of Lots)
The Thirteen Attributes of God are based on Exodus XXXIV: 6-7.

Had Gadya–One Little Goat
Had gadya, had gadya;
Dizvan Abba Bitrei Zuzei. Had gadya, Had gadya.

One little goat
My father bought for two zuzim.
Had gadya, had gadya.

Then came the cat and ate the goat,
My father bought for two zuzim.
Had gadya, had gadya.

Then came the dog and bit the cat,
that ate the goat,
My father bought for two zuzim.
Had gadya, had gadya.

Then came the stick and beat the dog,
that bit the cat that ate the goat,
My father bought for two zuzim.
Had gadya, had gadya.

Then came the fire and burned the stick,
that beat the dog that bit the cat,
that ate the goat,
My father bought for two zuzim.
Had gadya, had gadya.

Then came the water and quenched the fire,
that burned the stick that beat the dog,
that bit the cat that ate the goat,
My father bought for two zuzim.
Had gadya, had gadya.

Then came the ox and drank the water,
that quenched the fire that burned the stick,
that beat the dog that bit the cat,
that ate the goat,
My father bought for two zuzim.
Had gadya, had gadya.
Then came the butcher and slew the ox,
that drank the water that quenched the fire,
that burned the stick that beat the dog,
that bit the cat that ate the goat,
My father bought for two zuzim.
Had gadya, had gadya.

Then came the angel of death,
and killed the butcher that slew the ox,
that drank the water that quenched the fire,
that burned the stick that beat the dog,
that bit the cat that ate the goat,
My father bought for two zuzim.
Had gadya, had gadya.

Then came the Holy One, blessed be He!
And destroyed the Angel of death,
that killed the butcher that slew the ox,
that drank the water that quenched the fire,
that burned the stick that beat the dog,
that bit the cat that ate the goat,
My father bought for two zuzim.
Had gadya, had gadya.

Material adapted by Rabbi Carl Choper from:

The Passover Haggadah: A Guide to the Seder; Jewish Federations of North America
http://jewishfederation.org/images/uploads/holiday_images/39497.pdf

The Union Haggadah, Central Conference of American Rabbis, 1923
http://www.sacred-texts.com/jud/uh/index.htm

English Haggadah Text with Instructional Guide
http://www.chabad.org/holidays/passover/pesach_cdo/aid/661624/jewish/English-Haggadah.htm

Biblical Translations are from the Jewish Publication Society 1917 version
http://www.sacred-texts.com/bib/jps/index.htm